To the Point

Warning: Read this blog at your own risk. The author does not guarantee you will like the content herein. He cannot guarantee you happiness, wellness, satisfaction, comprehension or contentment.--TL Simons

Friday, September 18, 2015

Essay of the Month













In the current historical moment in the United States, the emptying out of language is nourished by the assault on the civic imagination. One example of this can be found in the rise of Donald Trump on the political scene. Donald Trump’s popular appeal speaks to not just the boldness of what he says and the shock it provokes, but the inability to respond to shock with informed judgement rather than titillation. Marie Luise Knott is right in noting that “We live our lives with the help of the concepts we form of the world. They enable an author to make the transition from shock to observation to finally creating space for action—for writing and speaking. Just as laws guarantee a public space for political action, conceptual thought ensures the existence of the four walls within which judgment operates.”[1] The concepts that now guide our understanding of American society are dominated by a corporate induced linguistic and authoritarian model that brings ruin to language, politics and democracy itself.

Henry Giroux lights up the latest forms of U.S. totalitarianism, with a little help from Hannah Arendt.


TS

No comments:

Post a Comment